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Are Eggs Good For Dogs?
Posted by Abby Rosenberg on February 8, 2012
Filed under PetMeds Spotlight

An occasional raw egg is okay for a healthy dog.

Eggs are nutrient rich, high in protein and most dogs love them.  While it is okay to occasionally give your dog a treat of a small amount of cooked egg, the question of raw eggs is more complicated.

Raw eggs, specifically raw egg whites, contain an enzyme called avidin. The avidin acts to bind the water-soluble B vitamin called biotin, preventing its absorption in the gastrointestinal tract.  Additionally, raw eggs may carry bacteria such as salmonella.  Biotin plays an important role in maintaining healthy skin and coat.  A deficiency of biotin can eventually result in dermatitis, hair loss, diarrhea and other symptoms.

The good news: When you cook a raw egg, the avidin is deactivated.  Additionally, raw egg yolks are rich in biotin. Dogs have a shorter intestinal tract than humans and are less likely to have gastrointestinal upset from salmonella.  An occasional raw egg is generally safe for a healthy dog, as long as your pet does not have an allergy to eggs.

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