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How to Keep Your Pet Out of a Shelter
Posted by Abby Rosenberg on March 10, 2012
Filed under PetMeds Spotlight

Should your dog or cat escape from your home, chances are good that your pet may end up in a shelter.  While less than 2 percent of cats and 15-20 percent of dogs in shelters end up being reunited with their owners, the lucky pets that were returned were able to be identified.  How can you make sure your beloved pet does not end up in a shelter, and if it does happen, that you are reunited?

First, make sure your pet cannot get loose.  Keep your dog leashed when you go on walks together. If your dog has access to your yard, make sure your yard is securely fenced.  While some pet parents allow their cats access to the outdoors, most experts agree that your cat is safer and will live a longer, healthier life if kept indoors. Spaying or neutering your pet will reduce the urge for your pet to roam, and ensure that your dog or cat does not contribute to the pet overpopulation problem.

Even the most careful pet parent can occasionally have a dog or cat escape from the house, and even indoor-only cats can be escape artists.  It is important that your pet has identification just for this purpose.   Consider I.D. tags, a microchip or tattoo identification for your pet.  Make sure to keep the information on the I.D. tag or microchip up to date. Proper identification will greatly increase the odds that you will be reunited should your pet escape.

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One Response to “How to Keep Your Pet Out of a Shelter”

  1. Microchipping Your Pet | PetMeds.org on 29 Mar 2012 at 8:30 am #

    [...] when their pet goes to the vet to be spayed or neutered. Should your dog or cat become lost and is taken to a shelter, one of the first things the shelter will do is scan your pet for a microchip, greatly increasing [...]

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