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New Year’s Eve Safety for Pets
Posted by Abby Rosenberg on December 31, 2012
Filed under PetMeds Spotlight

While New Year’s Eve can be a fun evening for us, for our pets it can be a scary time with the loud noises and lights of the fireworks, strange people in the house, and general disruption in routine. Take a few extra precautions to make sure that ringing in the New Year isn’t a terrifying ordeal for your pets:

  • Keep your pet safely confined indoors. If you plan to have guests over, settle your pets into a quiet room with access to food, water, a familiar toy, a soft place to snuggle, a litter box for your cat, and a crate for your dog. If possible, choose a room without windows as frightened pets have been known to try to jump through windows; alternatively, make sure any windows are securely shut and the curtains closed. Don’t allow guests into this room, even to drop off jackets or purses.
  • Even if you’re keeping your pets safely confined, each pet should have a microchip and/or an ID tag with your current contact information. Be sure to use a breakaway/safety collar for cats. Dogs and cats can get spooked and try to escape, or a guest may unknowingly open the door to the room in which your pets are confined.
  • Try to keep to your familiar routine as much as possible. Walk your dog at the normal time, feed your dog or cat his regular food.
  • Make sure your pets do not have access to items that are dangerous if ingested such as unattended alcoholic beverages, streamers, balloons, fireworks, and holiday foods such as chocolate.
  • Keep the number of an emergency vet contact available just in case so you are prepared in case of an accident or pet emergency.

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