Protective Gear for Doggie Paws

Protecting your dog’s feet is an essential part of being a responsible and caring dog owner. If you wouldn’t walk somewhere barefoot, would you expect your dog to? Always think about his comfort and safety when taking him out in the elements. Dogs can suffer from chafing, blistering, and cuts in the same way that you can if you go outside with no socks or shoes. The good news is that there are many types of footwear available for dogs. There are great solutions for all types of weather and medical problems that affect your dog’s feet.

Orthopedic Dog Shoes
If your dog has trouble walking, has an injury, or slides and falls on slippery floors, orthopedic dog shoes could save him a lot of grief. Large breed dogs like German Shepherds and Retrievers are especially susceptible to hip dysplasia and degenerative diseases which making mobilizing difficult and painful. Orthopedic shoes are often used to protect a foot or pad injury, provide ankle support, provide extra padding, or to encourage lifting of the foot off of the ground.

Aside from sheer cuteness, dog slippers will keep cold doggie feet snug during cold and damp months. Winter and spring mornings are often accompanied by really cold kitchen and hardwood floors. Fuzzy duck or bunny slippers are not only absolutely adorable but keep your dog’s sensitive or arthritic feet cozy during those cold mornings while the house is warming up. The non-skid soles will keep him safe as he comes running for his breakfast.

Socks serve many purposes for both you and your pet. Non-skid socks help your older dog walk easily throughout your home while protecting your hardwood floors from his nails. Socks are also great for dogs are recovering from a foot injury because they cover gauze or medications that would otherwise be chewed or licked off. Another excellent use for dog socks is to curb incessant licking by dogs with allergies and bad habits.

When hot weather approaches, what better footwear to own than some doggie sandals? If you are planning some hiking or beach visits, having some sandals to slip on Fido will make the trip much better for both of you. Protect your dog’s feet from burning sand and forest debris with some easy to slip on and off sandals.

Just like you, your dog can suffer exercise injuries if not protected. If you and your pooch enjoy running together, investing in dog running shoes may be an excellent investment for his health. Save him the discomfort of rough pavement and aching joints, and save yourself expensive vet bills by donning some doggy running shoes before your outing. Sneakers come in different strength fabrics and levels of support depending on your needs.

Rain Gear
Springtime is one of the worst seasons for your dog. Maneuvering on wet surfaces is difficult and dangerous for older dogs with arthritis. Dogs that have a muddy area to do their business in will track mud and water all over the house with every outing. By covering his paws before he goes out, you protect him from slipping and sliding and you save yourself the trouble of chasing a wet dog everywhere when he runs inside. Simply stop him at the door and remove his shoes. It’s a lot easier to rinse some shoes off than washing your muddy dog.

Snow Boots
If you have a dog with long hair, you already know that coming in from the snow can be disastrous. Little balls of snow and chunks of ice collect on your dog’s paws, making it difficult for him to walk. My dog has spent hours chewing and licking her feet because of ice and snow. Not only will snow shoes keep your dog’s feet warm and safe from frostbite and rock salt, they will provide stable comfort while walking on slippery surfaces.

About author

Erin Gleeson

Erin Gleeson is the Outreach Specialist at PetMeds and works with the PetMeds Cares donations program. She has loved animals as long as she can remember and has worked in several veterinary offices in the past as a veterinary technician. She has one cat, a middle-aged tabby/tortie from a south Florida cat rescue. You can also find Erin on Google+.

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