Two Manufacturers Recall Chicken Jerky Pet Treats

Two different pet food manufacturers are taking their chicken jerky treats off the market as they may contain traces of poultry antibiotics. The chicken jerky treats were manufactured in China, and while the antibiotics have been approved for use in China, they are not approved in the U.S.

The affected products are:

  • Nestle Purina PetCare’s Waggin’ Train and Canyon Creek Ranch chicken jerky dog treats
  • Milo’s Kitchen Chicken Jerky and Chicken Grillers home-style dog treats

The companies specify that the treats don’t pose a safety risk for pets and no illnesses have been reported. Chicken jerky pet treats manufactured in China have been under scrutiny by the Food and Drug Administration, and the FDA specifies that they have been aware since 2007 of “increasing numbers of illnesses in pets associated with the consumption of jerky pet treats.”  However, there is no indication that the issue with the antibiotic residue is connected to the current investigation regarding chicken jerky pet treats.

If you have any of the affected products, you are urged to dispose of it or return it to place of purchase for a refund.

Comments

  1. Amanda says

    There are two more brands that were recalled in last two days. Cadet chicken jerky and Publix chicken tender dog treats.

  2. Joe says

    Curious situation here! Our local Wal-Marts STILL have these treats on the shelves; you take the product to the cashier, then you’re told about the recall! FDA says there’s no ‘issues/dangers’ about the antibiotics. Nestles/Purina has done it’s own recall to calm public fears. Our vet says that as long as we don’t give our dog more than suggested per day, there isn’t any danger. (Another vet even said that the antibiotics in the treats helped lessen joint pains in older dogs.) So, the problem is, who do you believe? Our dog has been getting Chicken Jerky treats for 3+ years and is healthy as the proverbial horse!

  3. Eric Wyrostek says

    I was at Wal-Mart yesterday 1/12/13 and noticed both of these products were on their shelves, shouldn’t they be notified to pull these products?

  4. Doug Wallace says

    This seems to be mass hysteria. The antibiotics in question are in minute quantity, and there is no known reason this could kill a dog, but this is the only thing the recall mentions. My guess is that this may not be direct cause and effect, some dogs die from twisted bowels caused by jumping, and others die from eating poisonous plants,it could be that the few dogs that did die after eating these might have died anyway from other problems, and the owners figured that correlation is the same as causation.

    However, I have fed my dogs jerky treats, and it can cause diarrhea and vomiting. But if you feed a dog something different than they have had in a while, that will cause diarrhea and vomiting, too.

    The labels recommend not giving your dogs more than 3 or 4 in a day. Jerky is, by definition, a low-moisture food, and eating too much of it can cause dehydration, and the low water level can create stomach discomfort. Just try eating too much jerky yourself without any liquid, and you can see the effect on yourself.

    Similar things I have been told by pet-lovers are in this vein, like Swiffer floor cleaing liquid has ethylene glycol in it, and that dogs will get sick and die from licking their paws after walking over a freshly mopped floor. It turns out that there is no ethylene glycol in it, and never was. I understand the motivation behind protecting your pets, I have 8 dogs, but come on, let’s not get hysterical and deprive your dog of all pleasures in the world just to keep them safe.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>