1-800-Petmeds logo
Welcome  | Sign In | Reorder | My Account | Contact Us | Cart Shopping Cart
Max and Molly - 1800PetMeds mascots
Dogs Cats Horses
  Free Shipping
   
Breath Fresheners
Chews and Treats
Rinses
Toothpaste
Antibiotic Anti-Infective
Cleansers
Mites
Antibiotic Anti-Infective
Eye Inflammation
Tears Lubricants
Tear Stain Remover
Flea Preventatives
Home Flea Relief
Pet Flea Relief
Heartworm Preventatives
Joint Pain
Joint Supplements
Orthopedic Beds
Allergy
Antibiotics Anti-Infective
Antifungal Antiprotozoal
Anxiety
Cough
Diabetes
Digestive
Diuretics
Heart Blood Pressure
Hormonal Endocrine
Seizure Disorder
Urinary Tract and Kidneys
Weight Loss
Wormers
Natural Remedies
Pain Medications
Anti-bacterials
First Aid
Fly Control
Grooming Tools
Hairball Remedies
Itch Relief
Omega 3
Ringworm
Shampoos
Shedding
Skin Medications
Supplements
Beds
Bowls
Leashes
Perfumes
Pet Food
Stain Removers
Toys
Training Aids
Treats
Antioxidants
Brewers Yeast
Calcium
Dietary
Digestive Enzymes
Liver Support
Multivitamins
Omega 3
Potassium
Seniors
Whole Foods
PetMeds® Charitable Causes

PetMeds® Supports the Pet Community


What Does a Wagging Tail Really Mean?
Posted by Abby Rosenberg on January 23, 2012
Filed under PetMeds Spotlight

A wagging tail does not always signify a happy, friendly dog!

Most people assume a wagging tail means a friendly, happy dog, but is this always true? Dogs use their tails to relay information to people and to other dogs, and generally do not wag their tails when they are alone.  Some experts believe that the wagging tail helps to transmit their scent to other dogs.  To decipher why a dog is wagging his tail, you will need to be aware of other social cues.

If a dog is in the presence of other dogs, a wagging tail held high may actually be a sign of dominance or even aggression.  A wagging tail, along with barking or growling can be a warning to stay back. Wagging just the tip of the tail can indicate uncertainty.

However, a tail held straight out and wagging broadly generally indicates excitement and/or happiness.  This type of tail wag is commonly seen when a dog is greeting his owner. Keep in mind that wolves rarely wag their tails, and when they do so, it indicates submission.  A dog is showing fear or submission when his wagging tail is held low, and sometimes even tucked between the back legs.

If you pay attention to your dog’s body language, you can learn to better interpret what his wagging tail really means.

No related posts.

2 Responses to “What Does a Wagging Tail Really Mean?”

  1. rebecca on 23 Jan 2012 at 8:56 am #

    How does all that apply to a dog with a curled tail?

  2. Abby PetMeds Pro on 23 Jan 2012 at 11:20 am #

    For dogs with short, curled or no tail, you will need to focus more on other cues such as overall body language to read his mood and intention.

Trackback URI | Comments RSS

Leave a Reply