Nibbles’ Adoption Story

My name is Sandy. I am a volunteer dog walker at my local Humane Society. When I first started 4 years ago, my husband told me he realized we’d eventually end up with a dog, but he had one rule-absolutely, positively NO CHIHUAHUAS! He said they were yappy little dogs and he didn’t like them. I said that was fine, because I didn’t really care for the smaller dogs anyway.

About 4 months after I started volunteering, I was helping a group of people stuff kongs for the shelter dogs, and the lady in charge at the time had this cute little Chihuahua with her, and mentioned that she needed a foster home for the dog, for about a month. The dog’s name was Nibbles. She had demodex (non-contagious mange), probably from the stress of being a stray for an unknown period of time, poor nutrition, and the stress of being in a shelter environment. She needed to be fostered while she was being treated. I called my husband and he said fine, but we weren’t keeping her. I agreed, saying I didn’t want to be a foster failure the first time!

I was told to be careful with her around new people, because she was a little unpredictable how she’d react. I got all the supplies, and took her home. She was a little cautious of my husband but warmed up quickly. She had to have most of her teeth pulled when she was brought into the shelter because they were in such bad shape. Since her first reaction to anything that frightened her was to try to bite, her having no teeth in the front was actually a good thing!

A week after I got her home, we were both attached, but I was still determined to take her back and let a good family adopt her when she was healthy. After 2 weeks, my husband said “Okay, we can keep her!” I was still determined to let someone else adopt her. At the end of the 4 weeks, they said it didn’t look like her medicated baths were working. I could keep fostering her, but I would have to pay for her treatment myself. I took her to my vet, he checked her out and said the mites were gone, she just needed time to let the hair grow back. I let the shelter know, and they said to bring her in, and they’d to the temperament testing, and other testing they needed to do before placing her in adopt.

After her spending the  day there getting all the behavior things done, I went to pick her up, and they said she did not do well, and there was no way they could place her in adopt. She was 6 years old at the time, and none of the breed specific rescues would take her. I talked to my husband, though I knew what his answer would be, and we decided to adopt her ourselves. We were used to her, and she to us, we knew how to handle her, etc. She’s been a part of our lives for almost 4 years now. She is such a great dog. She still doesn’t like most people, at least not in the beginning, but she warms up quickly. She protects anyone and anything she feels is being hurt. If she thinks someone is playing too rough with her sister Peanut, she’ll bark and chase them away. If she thinks someone is being hurt, even if she thinks me or my husband are the ones doing the hurting, she’ll chase the one doing the harm away. She even protects complete strangers! She is also very good at telling all animals and people who are making too much noise to be quiet!

Attached are pictures of just Nibbles, and one of her sister Peanut using her as a pillow. She didn’t mind that, Peanut was keeping her warm! Her sister Peanut is a 1 year old pit bull. I consider her a “rescue” even though I didn’t get her from a shelter. A family friend had 9 pit bull puppies she was going to sell on a local website, or on the side of the road, and I wanted to make sure at least some of them went to decent homes, instead of possibly being used as bait or fighting dogs!

Thank you for sharing Nibbles’ rescue and adoption story with us, Sandy.  We think you and Nibbles were meant to be together!

Want to see your own rescue dog or cat featured here? Just email PetMeds at rescuepet@petmeds.com and share your pet’s adoption story and a photo or two of your own rescue dog or cat.

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Erin

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